Bibliophile Lass (bibliogirl) wrote,
Bibliophile Lass
bibliogirl

Whee, busy busy busy.

I seem to have spent much of the last few days either spending money like it's going out of fashion or trying to plan large and complex projects.

Mind you, the "large and complex project" concerned is not exactly work-related -- it's the dinner party I am throwing in a couple of weeks for all of my ex-employees and their partners to celebrate the business's 10th anniversary. So, eleven people for a sit-down meal of somewhere around the six-course mark (canapés, starter, main course, dessert, cheese, tea/coffee/sweeties). Throw in a couple of vegetarians (i.e. more than one main course) and this should be fun. This weekend I must count plates and cutlery and see if I need to go and acquire some more of that... and I must clear out my kitchen a bit so that I have some work surfaces to put stuff down on.

Yes, there has been a spreadsheet involved to plan the shopping list. (Yay, geek cookery!)

Yes, there will be pictures.

Other than that, I have ordered the new corset I wish to wear to DT (WINOLJ)'s birthday party, and caffeine_fairy and I must go fabric shopping at some point for the remainder of the costume. Downstairs, we have a new colour laser printer awaiting removal from its packaging and installation. The corset was, er, more expensive than the laser printer, which is perhaps as it should be ;)

Books: I am almost done with SOE Syllabus: Lessons in Ungentlemanly Warfare, World War II which is a fascinating read. Every Call of Cthulhu player should read it, for starters, since it deals quite extensively with how to make a raid on premises without getting caught by the Nazis cultists standing just inside the front door.

The Atrocity Archives, by Charles Stross (aka autopope, not "antipope" as originally typed), is sheer delight. Hackers plus Cthulhu, what more could I ask for? Reminds me of Michael Marshall Smith with a bit more tech involved. (There are another two novels of his on my in-pile at the moment, there's one in transit from the US, and my copy of Toast -- short stories, same author -- just got back from the friend to whom I'd lent it.)

Tolkien's Gown and Other Stories of Great Authors and Rare Books is a good read if you are a book collector. It focuses on the high-end rarities of the twentieth century and the stories behind them.

Mouse or Rat?: Translation as Negotiation is Umberto Eco's take on the processes involved in translation into various languages, including the translation of books which include dialect, poetry, etc. Fascinating stuff.
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